Energy

 

CCHRC is always looking for ways to develop more affordable, efficient heating and ventilation systems for cold climates. We look to build on existing technologies and test emerging systems that can be adapted to Alaska's unique climate and challenges. Our energy research includes ground source heat pumps on cold soils, air source heat pumps, solar thermal storage, a variety of biomass appliances, and an innovative system that combines heating and ventilation to improve indoor air quality in efficient homes.

 

As the farthest north LEED Platimun building in the world, our number 1 strategy is to reduce energy use through a well-insulated, airtight building envelope. Having minimized demand, we try to produce as much energy from alternative sources as possible. Our goal is to go entirely off fossil fuels through a mix of solar, geothermal, and biomass heating, in addition to thermal storage. Read about our progress here!

Click below for information on heating systems: 

Projects

Biomass Greenhouse Handbook CCHRC produced a handbook for school districts about how to build and operate a biomass-heated greenhouse.
Thermal Storage Demonstration at CCHRC CCHRC is demonstrating a thermal storage system that uses water to seasonally store energy from the sun. Click here for live data!
Thermal Mass Study Thermal mass is the ability of a material to absorb and store heat energy, which can be useful when it comes to cold climate housing. This project clarifies the role of thermal mass in housing and includes a literature review and energy modeling with IDA Indoor Climate and Energy (ICE) software.
Air Source Heat Pumps for Residential Baseboard Heating CCHRC is working with utilities in Southeast Alaska to identify air source heat pumps that work for homes with baseboard hydronic heating. CCHRC is investigating the stats and availability of compatible technologies for residential applications in the U.S. and foreign markets.
Hybrid Micro-Energy Project This project was designed to explore and demonstrate how a variety of renewable energy sources can be integrated to power single- and multi-family housing energy demands in Alaska.